DELAWARE STUDENTS TAKE ON WASHINGTON, D.C.

If you’re a fan of great food and entertainment, then we’re sure you’ll have a lot of fun at our Annual Meeting on Tuesday, August 13th. Registration and our famous fried chicken dinners will be served starting at 3 p.m. and our Business Meeting will begin at 7 p.m.

Delaware Electric Cooperative is investing millions of dollars to improve its system reliability in 2019. The improvements will ensure members lose power less often. While 2018 marked the most reliable year ever for DEC’s system, we’re not done working to make the system even stronger. The biggest project facing Co-op engineers in 2019 is the construction of a new Zoar Substation near Georgetown in Sussex County. DEC will build a new substation on Zoar Road across the street from a current Co-op switching station. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative crews took home top honors at the Gaff-N-Go Lineman’s Rodeo held May 10-11 near Richmond, VA. One DEC team comprised of Philip Collison, Michael Layton and Dave Morgan was named the overall competition winner among Mid-Atlantic electric cooperatives. The team competed against dozens of other teams in competitions testing their ability to quickly climb utility poles and replace electrical equipment 40 feet in the air.

Delaware Electric Cooperative has installed its 100,000th meter, a major milestone for the not-for-profit utility founded back in 1936. The 100,000th meter was installed to serve a pole barn on the property of Erica Campbell outside of Greenwood in Sussex County. The property was one of the first electrified by the Cooperative back in the late 1930s .

We hope you’ll be able to join us on August 13th for dinner, a community fair and an update on your Cooperative.  Our annual meeting begins with registration and dinner at 3 p.m. at the Centre Ice Rink at the Delaware State Fairgrounds. If you are interested in being a candidate for your Co-op’s Board of Directors, you must submit a petition to our office in Greenwood, DE by June 13th, 2019.

An EF-2 tornado with winds of 120 mph struck Delaware Electric Cooperative’s service territory the morning of April 15th. The storm knocked out power to six-thousand Co-op members and left debris scattered for several miles across Sussex County. 

How would you like to save money on your electricity bill and make a little extra? By joining Delaware Electric Cooperative’s new Beat the Peak with Nest program, you can! DEC members, who have installed or are willing to install a Nest thermostat, can participate in this exciting new program, when they agree to allow DEC to remotely adjust their thermostats by a few degrees during Beat the Peak alerts. 

National studies consistently rank power line installers and repairers among the most dangerous jobs in the country, and for good reason. Laboring high in the air wearing heavy equipment and working directly with high voltage creates the perfect storm of a dangerous and unforgiving profession. But electric lineworkers are up to the task. These brave men and women are committed to safety, as well as the challenges of the job.

2018 was the most reliable year in the history of Delaware Electric Cooperative. During 2018, members lost power less often and experienced shorter power outages when compared to previous years. Overall, the average DEC member experienced 1.36 outages in 2018 with interruptions averaging only 84 minutes. In 2017, members experienced 1.43 outages lasting an average of 94 minutes.

Delaware Electric Cooperative is relaunching its Irrigation Grant Program, which provides financial assistance to farmers who convert their diesel-driven irrigation systems to electric. The Co-op grants will cover the first $7,500 of the cost to run electric to irrigation systems. 

If your home’s heating source is electric, you probably dread opening up your electric bill each January and February. These months are traditionally the coldest of the year and this January hasn’t broken with tradition. Temperatures for much of the month remained cold and that means many Co-op members used more power in January than they did in December. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s (DEC) Board of Directors has voted to return $7.7 million in capital credits to the Cooperative’s member-owners in December. Capital credits are also known as the Co-op’s profits or margins. Because DEC is a not-for-profit utility, margins are returned to the people the Cooperative serves.

The United States Senate in October passed a bipartisan resolution honoring Delaware Electric Cooperative and its “Beat the Peak” Program for saving Co-op members millions of dollars. The resolution was sponsored by Democratic Delaware Senator Chris Coons and Republican Colorado Senator Cory Gardener.

We’d like to thank all the DEC employees and volunteers who participated in the annual Hands and Feet Community Service Day on Saturday, September 29th! The service day, hosted by 88.7 The Bridge and the Co-op, brought hundreds of people together to volunteer at non-profits across Delmarva.

Delaware Electric Cooperative, in partnership with Touchstone Energy Cooperatives, is pleased to announce the third annual #WhoPowersYou Contest, honoring local heroes. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative members elected Blaine Daisey to a two-year term on the Co-op’s board of directors on Tuesday. Mr. Daisey, a former Delaware State Trooper, won with 428 votes at DEC’s Annual Meeting. Challenger Cotton Collins received 203 votes.

DEC employees have transformed the Co-op over the past several decades into one of the most progressive utilities in the nation.

Initially, Beat the Peak alerts were emailed to members and broadcast on local radio and TV stations. Eventually though, a phone call to Bill from a concerned member led to one of DEC’s proudest innovations. 
 

Delaware Electric Cooperative will hold its annual community fair and business meeting on Tuesday, August 7th at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. Members will be treated to a free chicken dinner, have a chance to visit with various community organizations and hear an update on the state of the Cooperative from President and CEO Bill Andrew.

The appeal of electric vehicles is gaining momentum. The push for greater mileage in terms of MPG that began in the second half of the last century has been joined by the push for greater miles
per charge. 
 

What do you get when three students from Delaware Electric Cooperative’s service territory join 1,800 of their peers from across the United States? Why, you get the National Rural Electric Cooperative Youth Tour!  
 

An efficient new natural gas-driven power plant is now producing energy for tens of thousands of Delaware homes. The Wildcat Point plant, located in Rising Sun, Md., became fully operational in April.

Testing their skills against more than 150 linemen from across the East Coast, nine Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC) employees took part in the 16th Annual Gaff-n-Go Lineman’s Rodeo, held May 12 at Meadow Event Park in Doswell, Va. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s board of directors has selected Blaine Daisey, Sr. as interim At-Large director. Daisey will fill the seat vacated by longtime board member Howard Clendaniel, who passed away in March.

Delaware Electric Cooperative is always working to provide reliable, affordable power to members with the least possible impact on the environment. We currently own and operate a 20-acre solar energy farm in Georgetown and purchase additional energy produced by wind and solar farms around the region. Still, we know some members may want to do more. 

Longtime Delaware Electric Cooperative board member Howard A. Clendaniel passed away on March 19 after more than 20 years of distinguished service to the Cooperative and its 95,000 members.

Dane Zimmerman, a 2017 Electric Cooperative Youth Tour participant whose parents are members of Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC), traveled to Nashville, TN this past week for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA)’s 76th Annual Meeting. As his state’s representative to the national Electric Cooperative Youth Leadership Council (YLC), Zimmerman participated in the Parade of Flags held during the opening session.

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s President and CEO Bill Andrew has been named an Honorary Commander for the Delaware State Police. Andrew was named an Honorary Commander of Troop Three near Camden in Kent County. Andrew was inducted into the program at a special ceremony held on Wednesday, January 24th at the Delaware State Police Museum in Dover. Delaware State Police Superintendent Colonel Nathaniel McQueen Jr. led the ceremony, which honored outgoing 2017 Honorary Commanders and welcomed the 2018 honorees.

Construction of a massive new warehouse has been completed at Delaware Electric Cooperative’s headquarters along Rt. 13 south of Greenwood. The 20,000 square-foot building will house electrical equipment and other supplies used to maintain the Cooperative’s more than 7,000 miles of power lines.

Many of our members likely saw the impact of several weeks of record cold when they opened their January electric bills. Because of the brutally cold weather, electric bills for January were expected to be at least 30 percent higher than during the same period last year. Temperatures dipped below zero in many places in January and heaters had to work overtime to keep homes and businesses comfortable. If your home’s heating source is electric, it took a lot more electricity to keep your house warm last month. 

2017 will go down as one of the most reliable years ever for Delaware Electric Cooperative’s system, the result of decades of hard work and infrastructure investments. The average number of power interruptions per member fell to 1.43 in 2017 from 1.71 in 2016. The average outage duration also fell from 109 minutes in 2016 to 94 minutes in 2017. For members, this means outages were less frequent and didn’t last as long.

Delaware Electric Cooperative is relaunching its Irrigation Grant Program, which provides financial assistance to farmers who convert their diesel-driven irrigation systems to electric. The Co-op grants will cover the first $7,500 of the cost to run electric to irrigation systems. The remaining utility cost of converting those irrigation systems will then be split equally between farmers and DEC.

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s (DEC) Board of Directors has voted to return $4.8 million in capital credits to the Cooperative’s member-owners in December. Capital credits are also known as the Co-op’s profits or margins. Because DEC is a not-for-profit utility, margins are returned to the people the Cooperative serves. To receive a billing credit or check from the Cooperative, you must have been a Delaware Electric Cooperative member in 2002, 2003 or 2004. If a member has eligible capital credits of $100 or higher, they will receive a check.

Your Cooperative has once again launched its Operation Share Partnership with the Salvation Army. Operation Share is a program that benefits DEC members who have fallen on hard times and may have problems paying their bills. The Salvation Army, an organization with a long history of helping others, is able to identify those who have experienced unfortunate circumstances. During the month of December, the Co-op includes an Operation Share envelope with your regular electric bill. 

DEC, Delmarva Power and Catholic Charities are offering energy assistance fairs for consumers who are having trouble paying their energy bills.

The Christmas season is something all of us at Delaware Electric Cooperative look forward to, and it’s not just because it’s the most wonderful time of year! It’s also the season for giving, and each December we announce the return of capital credits to members. Traditionally, this means your Co-op will return millions of dollars to members in the form of either a check or billing credit. 

In December, Delaware Electric Cooperative members are expected to begin receiving power from a new natural gas-driven power plant in Cecil County, Maryland.  The Wildcat Point plant near Rising Sun will begin generating electricity in January. The plant will provide clean, reliable and affordable power to Delawareans for decades.

Your Co-op, in partnership with Touchstone Energy Cooperatives, is pleased to announce the second annual #WhoPowersYou Contest, honoring local heroes. It’s a chance for Co-op members to nominate someone who’s making a difference in our community, and an opportunity to celebrate the power of human connections. In addition to being nationally recognized, nominees can win up to $5,000 for the cause they champion. Last year, DEC member Karli Swope, a founder of the Grass Roots Rescue Society in Rehoboth was named a winner. She received a donation to help her keep rescuing neglected animals!

Delaware Electric Co-op is growing, and fast. We have expanded to 94,000 members across Kent and Sussex Counties, which, in turn, requires us to expand our facilities. The latest expansion will take us from our existing 8,000 square foot warehouse to a newly-constructed 20,000 square foot warehouse. Plans for the new warehouse began circulating in 2015 and now, two years later, the idea is coming to fruition.

 

Delaware Electric Cooperative is currently conducting a system-wide survey to determine where we have third-party attachments on our poles. Companies like Comcast, Verizon and Mediacom use our poles to attach some of their lines and equipment – they pay a fee to use our poles. This survey will ensure that the companies with attachments are being billed fairly.

Delaware Electric Cooperative held its annual membership meeting on Tuesday August 15th at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. More than 6,000 Co-op members and their families attended the annual event, which is the largest private gathering in southern Delaware. Guests were treated to a free fried chicken dinner, a community fair and music, courtesy of Junior Wilson. The business portion of the meeting featured music by the Jones Boys. Members also received an update on the state of the Cooperative from DEC’s President and CEO Bill Andrew.  

 The Virginia, Maryland and Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives (VMDAEC) awarded former DEC Vice President of Member Services Layton Wheeler with the electric Cooperative Distinguished Service Award on Monday, July 24th, at their annual meeting in Norfolk, Virginia. Speeches by current Vice President of Member Services Rob Book and DEC President and CEO Bill Andrew highlighted Wheeler's accomplishments throughout his career as a mentor, coworker and friend.

Delaware Electric Cooperative will hold its annual community fair and business meeting on Tuesday, August 15th at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. Members will be treated to a free chicken dinner, have a chance to visit with various community organizations and hear an update on the state of the Cooperative from President and CEO Bill Andrew. Included again this year is a utility demonstration, where Co-op crews will show members how they restore power and rescue those who are injured without the help of a bucket truck.

 

Three Delaware students enjoyed an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., June 11-15 as part of the 53rd annual National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Youth Tour. These rising high school seniors joined 1,700 other students from across the nation who participated in 
the event.

National Electric Cooperative Youth Tour develops future leaders.Three Delaware students enjoyed an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. June 11-15 as part of the 53rd Annual National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Youth Tour. Three rising high school seniors joined 1,700 other students from across the nation who participated in this event.

Delaware Electric Co-op headquarters, along with many homes and farms in the area, sustained damages in Monday night's storm.

DEC linemen attended the Gaff-n-Go Lineman’s Rodeo May 19-20 in Doswell, Va. With over 150 linemen participating, the competition was fierce. But the Co-op's team came through!

f you have been a member of DEC for a while, you know our number-one goal here at the Cooperative is to help our members, not only by providing them with electricity, but by helping them manage their energy use. One way we have been able to do that is through our Beat the Peak initiative. Started in 2008, Beat the Peak is a system that helps members monitor when energy costs are at their highest so they know when to conserve. It’s as simple as plugging in the in-home indicator and paying attention. In the long run, this device not only saves you energy, but money too.

Every year Delaware Electric Cooperative has an annual meeting. One of the most important activities we conduct is the election for the board of directors. These are the 11 people we entrust to give strategic direction and ensure the co-op has good governance. In 1844 when the 28 Rochdale pioneers created the modern cooperative movement, they were insistent that all members have the right to vote.

Five high school seniors whose families are served by Delaware Electric Cooperative have each earned $1,000 college scholarships awarded by the Educational Scholarship Foundation of the Virginia, Maryland & Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives (VMDAEC). This year, the VMDAEC Education Scholarship Foundation is awarding 50 $1,000 Worth Hudson scholarships to students who live in areas served by electric cooperatives in Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.

Electrical shocks in a pool occur when the Neutral-to-Earth Voltage (NEV) is brought into the pool vicinity by the grounded neutral from either the utility distribution system or the residential wiring system. Since pool equipment (pumps, lights, ladders) are grounded to protect from hazardous shocks due to electrical faults, the NEV always exists. The typical Voltage measured in the swimming pool ranges between 0 and 4 Volts and may cause a tingling sensation when a person comes in contact with the Voltage.

Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC) and Lightower Fiber Networks have completed work on a project that will improve the utility’s reliability and offer the possibility of faster broadband service to residents of rural Delaware. The Co-op and Lightower partnered in 2016 to construct a 250-mile, all fiber, network connecting DEC’s substations to the headquarters building in Greenwood, Del. The project is providing a secure and reliable broadband network connecting electrical devices across Kent and Sussex Counties.

Every year, we take the time to thank our extraordinary lineworkers who dedicate their lives to keeping the lights on in our local communities. Delaware Electric Co-op lineworkers maintain 7,000 miles of line in our service territory, and without them, our world would be dark. We depend on our entire staff to keep the lights on, but on April 10, 2017, we honor all lineworkers who often find themselves in dangerous and challenging situations, so our lives may be a little bit brighter and safer every day.

April marks  annual National Safe Digging Month, and Delaware Electric Cooperative would like to remind members to always call 811 a few days before any digging project. When members call 811, homeowners and contractors are connected to the local Miss Utility call center, which notifies the appropriate utility companies of a member’s intent to dig. Utility locators or contract locators are then sent to the requested digging site to mark the locations of underground lines with flags or paint.

 

 

Delaware Electric Cooperative member Karli Swope has been named a winner in Touchstone Energy’s national #Whopowersyou contest. Swope was named a winner for her efforts to rescue and care for animals at the Grass Roots Rescue Society, which she co-founded.

The contest asked members of electric cooperatives across the country to nominate individuals who have made a difference in their communities. Karli was nominated by her friend, Bonnie Arvay. Her entry received more than 1,200 online votes during the contest.

In January, Delaware Electric Cooperative announced a proposed rate decrease—the result of lower wholesale power costs and your efforts to conserve energy during beat the peak alerts. While the decrease will save you money each month, you may have noticed your electric bills have been higher the past two months. Each winter, our call center is flooded with concerns about higher winter electric bills and the reason is simple; the cold weather!  

The job of a Co-op lineman is already tough. We need your help to keep their job from becoming even more difficult. Over the past few months, crews have reported several incidents of nearly being struck by vehicles while working to restore power along our local roadways. Far too often our linemen say drivers do not slow down as they pass our crews working across our service territory. We’d like to ask all of our members to treat our linemen the same way you’d want a member of your family treated. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s Board of Directors is considering a rate decrease for all 93,000 member-owners. Co-op President and CEO Bill Andrew has requested the rate change and, if approved by the Board, rates for those served by Delaware Electric Cooperative would drop about five percent. The rate decrease would save the average family using 1,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity $6 per month, or $72 per year. While the Co-op’s rates have been adjusted periodically over the last decade, they remain the lowest in the State of Delaware.

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s Board of Directors has voted to return $6.3 million in capital credits to the Cooperative’s member-owners in December. Capital credits are also known as the Co-op’s profits or margins. Because DEC is a not-for-profit utility, margins are returned to the people the Cooperative serves. To receive a billing credit or check from the Cooperative, you must have been a Delaware Electric Cooperative member in 1999, 2000 or 2001. If a member has eligible capital credits of $100 or higher, they will receive a check.

A majority of Co-op members joined Delaware Electric Cooperative after 2000. The rapid development of our area led DEC to double its membership over the past 15 years. Many members moved to Delaware from areas of the Mid-Atlantic that are only served by investor-owned utilities. Electric cooperatives are very different from traditional utilities. First, cooperatives are member-owned, meaning you own the power lines, transformers, bucket trucks and even our headquarters building in Greenwood, Del. We answer to members and make decisions based on what’s best for them.

 

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s Fairmount Substation is undergoing an upgrade to keep up with growing demand in eastern Sussex County. The substation, located along Indian Mission Road, serves the Long Neck, Angola, and Millsboro areas. These portions of the County have experienced dramatic development over the past decade, leading to an increased demand for electricity.

 

 

In the 2012 national elections, voter turnout dropped by 9 percent overall, but the decline in rural counties was 18 percent—twice that of the nation as a whole. Today Delaware Electric Cooperative is joining a national program to help turn this around by encouraging our employees and members to register to vote and go to the polls in November.

Join the Delaware Electric Cooperative family as we partner with 88.7 The Bridge on the upcoming Hands & Feet community service project! On Saturday, October 1st, volunteers will meet at the location of their choice, either Dover or Seaford, working together to give back to their communities and the people within them

Three Delaware students enjoyed an expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., in June as part of the 52nd Annual National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Youth Tour. These high school juniors joined 1,700 other students from across the nation who participated in this event:

Abigail Bivens, Polytech 
High School
Kaylee Collison, Lake Forest High School
Andrew Evan, Sussex Central High School

As you drive across Delaware, carefully inspect the roofs of the houses you pass. You’ll likely find at least one home with solar panels in every development, especially near the beaches. Photovoltaic cells, also known as solar cells, are a relatively new technology — they weren’t invented until the 1950s. Still, decades before the official dawn of the age of solar power, scientists and inventors were harnessing the power of the sun. One Delaware man played an important role in the construction of the first solar thermal power station, built in Maadi, Egypt, in 1912. 

Delaware Electric Cooperative members will soon receive power from a new natural gas-driven power plant being built in Cecil County, Maryland.  The Wildcat Point plant is currently under construction near Rising Sun and is expected to begin generating electricity in the spring of 2017. Once completed, the plant will provide clean, reliable and affordable power to Delawareans for decades.

Delaware Electric Cooperative will hold its annual community fair and business meeting on Tuesday, August 9th at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. Members will be treated to a free chicken dinner, have a chance to visit with various community organizations and hear an update on the state of the Cooperative from President and CEO Bill Andrew. Included again this year is a utility demonstration, where Co-op crews will show members how they restore power and rescue those who are injured without the help of a bucket truck.

In many developments and neighborhoods in Delaware, you’ll find Co-op transformers (the green box shown in the picture below). These boxes are integral to the underground electrical system that provides electricity to the homes around them. These boxes are property of Delaware Electric Cooperative. Through agreements with developers, the Co-op legally has access to the land the box is on, as well as the land around it.

After a cool start to the summer, temperatures and humidity have finally skyrocketed to uncomfortable levels. Forecasters expect the the searing heat to continue through part of the weekend. To combat the weather, air conditioners have been running on full blast in homes, businesses and on farms all over the state. Because of this, Delaware Electric Cooperative has issued Beat the Peak alerts for both today and tomorrow, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The price of energy increases as demand for electricity increases.

Three Delaware students enjoyed an expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. June 12-16 as part of the 52nd Annual National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Youth Tour.

A partnership announced between Delaware Electric Cooperative and Lightower Fiber Networks will improve reliability for Co-op members in Central and Southern Delaware.

Lightower Fiber Networks is currently installing a 250-mile all fiber network across the Cooperative’s service territory in Kent and Sussex Counties. The new fiber network will provide communication to the utilities’ substations, electrical equipment and its headquarters building in Greenwood.

Over the past three years, the number of Delaware homeowners installing solar panels through a lease or power purchase agreement (PPA) has increased significantly. These are popular financing options for homeowners who are interested in installing clean energy solar panels without paying significant upfront costs or claiming ownership of the system. In both a solar lease and PPA agreement, the solar installer usually pays to install and maintain the system, and has ownership of the system equipment.

Delaware Electric Cooperative, Delaware’s only not-for-profit electric company, has been nominated for an Excellence in Business Award from the Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce (CDCC). The awards are presented to outstanding businesses serving the Kent County area—DEC was nominated in the Large Employer Category. Each member of the Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce has the chance to vote for the winner of the award, which will be announced at the CDCC’s Awards for Excellence dinner on June 21st. 

April marks the ninth annual National Safe Digging Month, and Delaware Electric Cooperative would like to remind members to always call 811 a few days before any digging project.

When members call 811, homeowners and contractors are connected to the local Miss Utility call center, which notifies the appropriate utility companies of a member’s intent to dig. Utility locators or contract locators are then sent to the requested digging site to mark the locations of underground lines with flags or paint.

Delaware Electric Cooperative crews work hard and it's time to celebrate National Lineman Appreciation Day. 

America’s electric cooperatives have designated the second Monday of April as National Lineman Appreciation Day.

On April 11, 2016, Delaware Electric Cooperative will honor the dedicated men who often work in challenging conditions to keep the lights on. We proudly recognize all electric linemen for the services they perform around the clock in dangerous conditions to keep power flowing and to protect the public’s safety.

Spring officially arrived more than two weeks ago, but try telling that to Mother Nature. The National Weather Service expects temperatures to fall into the mid-20s by Wednesday morning—the organization has issued a freeze warning for tonight.

With unusually cold April temperatures expected over the next 24 hours, energy use will likely soar. Delaware Electric Cooperative has issued a Beat the Peak alert from 7-9 tonight and 6-8 a.m. Wednesday, when energy use is expected to be highest.

During the alert period, you Co-op is asking members to voluntarily conserve energy.

Severe storms swept across central and southern Delaware Saturday night, downing trees and causing outages across Delaware Electric Cooperative’s Service territory. Around 11:30 p.m. Saturday night, the National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm warning for Kent and Sussex Counties. Wind gusts over 60 mph were reported, along with widespread reports of hail across the state. About 1,500 members lost power as the strong storms moved across the region.

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s President and CEO has been honored for his nearly two-decades of faithful service to the Cooperative and its members. Bill Andrew was presented with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Regional Award for Outstanding Service on September 9th in Charlotte, N.C.

It is in the mutual interest of Delaware Electric Cooperative and our members to ensure electrical meters are in an easily accessible location. Plants and landscaping, as well as decks and other structures, are meter obstructions which create problems for meter access and maintenance. Have a clear, safe walking path to the meter available at all times.  Avoid building or placing structures directly around the meter, which may have to be removed to access the meter.

Delaware Electric Cooperative and its dedicated to improving the lives of members.

Fifteen minutes south of Dover, the residents of picturesque Bowers Beach awoke to a beautiful fall morning on September 24. As they started their commute to work or departed for a day of work on the water, members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and crews from Delaware Electric Cooperative were already converging on their town. A huge volunteer effort was underway to make life safer for local mariners.

Delaware Electric Cooperative’s Board of Directors has voted to return $4.8 million in capital credits to the Cooperative’s member-owners in December. Capital credits are also known as the Co-op’s profits or margins. Because DEC is a not-for-profit utility, margins are returned to the people the Cooperative serves.